Jeremy Kashel's Blog

PowerPivot Settings for Power View

I’ve been using both PowerPivot and Power View quite a bit recently and, in addition to the post I did a while back, have made a few further observations on getting the two to play nicely together.

Building an Example PowerPivot Model

For this post I’ve created a very very simple PowerPivot model, based on the Adventure Works Internet Sales Fact table and its related tables. What this means is that after the model is built, I can build a variety of Excel reports that summarise the measures in the FactInternetSales Adventure Works fact table, such as Sales Amount, Tax Amount or Order Quantity. In the example below I’ve built a very basic report showing Order Quantity by year:

Excel report

On to Power View

Having already published the workbook to SharePoint, my task now is to create a Power View report, which can be done via the PowerPivot Gallery. If wanted to try and create a visual version of the above report in Power View (E.g. a graph), my steps would be to do first of all drag Calendar Year into the report, then Order Quantity. However, when doing this recently, the result wasn’t quite what I expected:

Table Without Sum

Order Quantity has not been summed at all, which is the opposite behaviour to that of PowerPivot. Consequently I can’t create a graph visualisation, because Power View thinks I don’t have any measures in my report:

Greyed Out Visualisations

Yet if we contrast this to measures such as Internet Sales Amount or Tax Amount, they all work fine. Upon looking at the field list for Internet Sales, we will see that Order Quantity is missing the sum symbol, as Power View has not interpreted it as a measure:


We can get around this in Power View with a bit of dragging and dropping, but we may as well look why it’s happened in the first place. The reason for this is the way in which the PowerPivot import wizard interprets SQL data types. The OrderQuantity column in the FactInternetSales SQL table has a data type of Smallint, which will not be summarised by default in Power View. Decimal and Money types are fine, hence why Tax Amount and Sales Amount above look ok.

Rather than changing the data types, we can force Power View to interpret the column as a measure by going to the PowerPivot advanced tab and clicking on Summarize By. If the Summarize By value is changed from Default to Sum, then Power View will interpret the column as a measure:


If we republish the model and then go back to Power View, we will see quite a difference with the same actions as before. First of all the field list is looking correct:

Summarize By After

Secondly, only dragging Calendar Year and Order Quantity will now give the following correct results:

Table With Sum After

Now that we have a measure, it means that we can now change the table into a visualisation of our choice:

Visualisations Enabled

Power View is the kind of product that power users are hopefully going to find intuitive, but we can make things even easier for users by making small changes like this.

Master Data Services in SQL Server 2012 RC0

There’s been a whole host of changes to MDS in the SQL Server 2012 RC (Release Candidate) 0 that came out the other week. This blog post gives an overview of the changes, before diving into detail on a few of them. At a high level, the following changes have been made to MDS:

  • Improved Master Data Manager front screen UI and navigation paths
  • Collections interface updated to Silverlight
  • Improved Excel user interface & functionality
  • Auto generation of entity code values, without using business rules
  • New deployment tool
  • SharePoint integration

Let’s take a look at each of these changes:

Improved Master Data Manager UI

Although the UI improvement (shown below) is good, the best thing about the Master Data Manager changes, in my opinion, is that clicking on the Explorer feature no longer takes you into the Model View, but instead takes you straight into your master data for your core entity (e.g. in a Customer model this entity would be Customer). I’m not sure if this would get a bit frustrating if you didn’t want the core entity, but then again everything seems very quick in RC0, so I don’t think it’s really going to matter.

Front screen

There’s also a new button next to a domain-based attribute that apparently has been designed to help with Many-to-Many relationships. I can definitely see that working, but it’s useful to have anyway to jump to the member details for the domain based attribute that you are viewing, many-to-many or not:


Collections Interface Updated to Silverlight

The collections interface is now much slicker, getting the Silverlight makeover seen in other areas of Master Data Manager. Switching between collections, for example, which could take a while in R2, now happens very quickly, making collections far more useable. The screen shot below shows how you edit collection members by picking members from one of the entities and adding those over into the collection by clicking the Add button:


Collections now have the concept of a Weight, meaning that you can alter the weighting value associated with the collection members, which could be useful for reporting purposes. The idea is that you extract the collection members and the weight values in a subscription view. A Weight column is actually included in the 2008 R2 collection subscription views, but there was no front end to modify the weight value, which has of course now changed:


Improved Excel User Interface and Functionality

The MDS Excel Ribbon has been given a makeover, meaning that you now see the following in the ribbon:

Excel toolbar

It’s interesting to see that the Favourites section has been replaced with the concept of ‘queries’. The idea is that you can send a query file via email to another user, providing that user has the Excel add-in. When the user double clicks on the query file (extension *.mdsqx), Excel will open and make a connection to MDS, using the connection and filter information provided in the file. This will result in Excel opening, with the user prompted if they would like to connect to MDS:

confirm connection

It’s also good to see that a few of the domain-based attribute issues have been addressed, namely the display of domain-based attribute names when you filter an entity and also the display of the names and the codes together in the Excel sheet. Here’s a screen shot of the how the attribute names are now visible when filtering the Country domain-based attribute that exists in the Customer model:


Auto Generation of Entity Code Values

If you wanted the code to be auto-generated in 2008 R2, you had to use a business rule. You can still do that if you want, but the create entity admin screen has changed slightly to include an option to auto generate the code. This works slightly better than business rules in my opinion, at least as far as the Excel add-in is concerned, as the code is returned to the user immediately after publishing, whereas the business rules require you to do a refresh in Excel and of course need more development! Here’s a screenshot of the add entity screen:


New Deployment Tool

Deployment has been altered in SQL 2012, with the addition of a new deployment tool, plus the fact that subscription views now get deployed. It seems that the current R2 deployment method (in the Administration section of Master Data Manager) is still included but now will not deploy data. To do that you need to use MDSModelDeploy.exe, as explained here. As an example, here’s how you can deploy the sample Customer model using MDSModelDeploy.exe, for default installations:

MDSModelDeploy deploynew –package “C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\110\Master Data Services\Samples\customer_en.pkg” –model “Customer” –service “MDS1”

SharePoint Integration and Further Details

Master Data Manager now supports a set of parameters that allow the MDS UI to be displayed without the header, menu bar and padding area. This means that MDS can now be incorporated into SharePoint or other websites. For the details on this, as well as more details on the above points, take a look at the following Technet article.

Working with Images in Power View

Power View includes several ways to create visualisations with images, ranging from a simple table, to the scrollable tile visualisation. In this post I’m going to explain a bit about the tile visualisation, showing how it can be used in Power View, before showing a couple of tips for working with images in both PowerPivot and Analysis Services Tabular models.

Power View Tiles

The Power View Tiles visualisation allows you to display a scrollable series of images, which, when clicked on, will display data of your choosing. The report below is an example of this:


What’s nice about the View above is that the names of the products are automatically displayed underneath the images. This is a sensible place to display the product names, as it means the area below can focus on whatever product level data you want, in this case Revenue by Month for the selected product.

This works fine in the sample models (in my case the Tailspin Toys model that I think came with CTP3) but it wont work in vanilla PowerPivot / Tabular models unless you configure a few model settings. Trying to reproduce the report above without these settings will give the following tile visualisation, minus the product names:


PowerPivot Advanced Settings

To address this in PowerPivot, you first of all need to switch to Advanced Mode, which you can do by selecting this option from the File menu in PowerPivot:


This gives you the following advanced tab:


Clicking on the highlighted Table Behaviour button in the ribbon gives you the following Table Behaviour window:


Here you can “change the default behaviour for different visualisation types and default grouping behaviour in client tools for this table”. The following properties should be set in order to get the tiles working correctly:

  • Row Identifier – Specifies a column that only contains unique values, which allows the column to be used as an internal grouping key in client tools.
  • Default Label – Specifies which column gives a row level display name, e.g. the product name in a Product table. This is key, as when a row level image is used, this property specifies which value to display alongside the image in tiles and other image-based visualisation.
  • Default Image – Specifies which column contains images representing the row level data, e.g. pictures of products.

The full details for all these properties can be found here.

Tabular Models

Tabular Models contain the same properties, which can be edited when you open a tabular project in the new SQL Server Data Tools. The image below shows how the properties have been configured for the column in my model called Image:


Back to Power View

If we now build a tile visualisation using the image column, we will see that we get the names of the products returned along with the image. It’s also worth noting that the Image and Product Name columns have now have an icon next to them, indicating that the field exhibits “row level” behaviour:


Finally, for some examples of what’s new in Power View SQL 2012 RC0 take a look at this post on the Reporting Services Team Blog.

Managing SSAS Named Sets with Master Data Services Collections

Master Data Services Collections are probably not the first feature that come to mind when you think of the MDS product. The hierarchies and member grids tend to be the core functionality, but as this post will hopefully show, MDS Collections are useful also.

Collections are essentially managed lists of members that can come from multiple different MDS explicit hierarchies, or also from another collection. The idea is that this “subset of members” can be maintained in MDS by a business user and then fed to external applications for reporting or other purposes.

Analysis Services Named Sets

One example of how collections can be used is to maintain Analysis Services named sets. Some named sets, such as a Top 50 Customers, don't require any maintenance, as it’s just the top 50 of all customers, based on a particular measure. On the other hand, sometimes named sets can be static lists, e.g. a list of core products that the user wants to see for reporting.

In the latter example, if a user wants the definition of a named set to change, they have to get IT to change the MDX script. MDS collections can help by allowing the user to control the named set definition, reducing the burden on IT.

Example Scenario 

Here’s an example of how this is done. First of all, the end game is that I have a named set in Analysis Services that is currently just for 3 products. Therefore, a user can easily drop this set into an Excel report to get quick access to the products that are important to them:


So the challenge is that we need to find some way of extending this named set without doing it manually. This is where MDS starts to come in, so using the sample Product model that comes with MDS, I’ve created a new collection called Favourite Products, as shown in the image below:


If I go and edit the Favourite Products collection in MDS, then I can drag and drop more products into this collection, or remove some existing members. In this case, I’ve chosen to add two new products:


C#, AMO and the MDS API

So the named set represents the target that we need to get to, whereas the MDS collection that’s shown is the source. To get the contents of the MDS collection to update the named set, one way of doing it is to use the MDS API to pick up the collection members, and then to use AMO in order to write the named set into the MDX script. I’m just doing this in a C# windows application, but you could do it via a batch process, such as SSIS. For this post I’m just going to show the code, so here goes:

This post is already starting to feel too long so I’m not going to show the basics of the MDS API. For that, take a look at a good posting by the MDS Team blog here. Also, as anyone who knows me will no doubt agree, I don’t tend to get involved in doing C#, so don’t consider this to be production ready! It should give you an idea of the basics though. Anyway, assuming that we’re now connected to the MDS Web Service, I’ve created the following method that will return the members from the collection:

private HierarchyMembers ObtainHierarchyMembers(string entityId, string hierarchyId, string modelId, string versionId)
    HierarchyMembersGetRequest request = new HierarchyMembersGetRequest();
    HierarchyMembersGetResponse response = new HierarchyMembersGetResponse();
    request.HierarchyMembersGetCriteria = new HierarchyMembersGetCriteria();

    //State that our hierarhcy type is a collection and that we want collection members
    request.HierarchyMembersGetCriteria.HierarchyType = HierarchyType.Collection;
    //Pass in the key search criteria to identify the correct collection in MDS
    request.HierarchyMembersGetCriteria.ParentEntityId = new Identifier { Name = entityId };
    request.HierarchyMembersGetCriteria.HierarchyId = new Identifier { Name = hierarchyId };
    request.HierarchyMembersGetCriteria.ModelId = new Identifier { Name = modelId };
    request.HierarchyMembersGetCriteria.VersionId = new Identifier { Name = versionId };

    request.HierarchyMembersGetCriteria.RowLimit = 50;
    request.International = new International();
    OperationResult result = new OperationResult();
    //Return the hierarchy members from the service
    return service.HierarchyMembersGet(request.International, request.HierarchyMembersGetCriteria, out result);

Before we use the above method, we need to connect to SSAS using AMO. That can be done quite easily with the following code:

Server server = new Server();
string connection = "Data Source=.;Catalog=Adventure Works DW 2008R2;";

After we’ve done all the usual error handling associated with connecting to a database, we need to pick up the SSAS database and cube:

Database database = server.Databases["Adventure Works DW 2008R2"];
Cube cube = database.Cubes["Adventure Works"];

Now we’re ready to call our ObtainHierarchyMembers method, before looping through it to build the named set:

StringBuilder mdx = new StringBuilder("\n//Auto generated named set at " + DateTime.Now.ToString() + 
    "\nCREATE SET CurrentCube.[Favourite Products] AS {");
int count = 1;
//Loop through the collection to build the mdx
foreach (ParentChild pc in hm.Members)
    //Add the members to the MDX string
    //This references the member by name
    //It would be possible to reference by member key, but would require more work
    mdx.Append("[Product].[Product].[" + pc.Child.Name + "]");
    if (count < hm.Members.Count())
        mdx.Append(", ");

Now we need to insert the named set in the correct place within the existing MDX script, bearing in mind it could already exist:

string currentScript = cube.MdxScripts[0].Commands[0].Text;
//Find the correct place to insert the named set within the MDX script:
int start = currentScript.IndexOf("\n//Auto generated named set at");
int end = 0;
StringBuilder newScript = new StringBuilder(currentScript);
if (start != -1)
    end = currentScript.IndexOf(";", start);
    //If the named set already exists, remove it
    newScript.Remove(start, end - start + 1);
    start = currentScript.Length;
//Insert the named set in the correct place
newScript.Insert(start, mdx.ToString());
//Update the cube's MDX script
cube.MdxScripts[0].Commands[0].Text = newScript.ToString();

Finally we just need to update the cube in order to write the MDX back to the cube:

//Call the update methods to update the cube

User Reports

Now that the cube has been updated, if the Excel report is refreshed, then the two new products will appear in the list:



Controlling SSAS named sets like this won’t be for everybody. I’ve certainly worked in a few clients where strict process has to be followed to update this sort of thing, but I can think of other companies that I know where this would be really useful.

Managing Analysis Services named sets is just one use for collections. Another example might be managing default multi-select parameters for SSRS reports. As collections are just lists of members that can be extracted easily, what you do with them is up to you!

Master Data Services Training in the UK

This is just a quick post to announce a range of SQL Server training courses, organised (and in some cases delivered) by Chris Webb. To start off there’s a SQL Server course delivered by Christian Bolton in December, followed by an Analysis Services course delivered by Chris in February. I’ll be delivering a Master Data Services course in February, before Chris delivers an MDX course in March.

The details for all the courses are:

  • SQL Server Internals and Troubleshooting Workshop - Christian Bolton – 6th – 7th December 2011

The Advanced Troubleshooting Workshop for SQL Server 2005, 2008 and R2 provides attendees with SQL Server internals knowledge, practical troubleshooting skills and a proven methodical approach to problem solving. The workshop will enable attendees to tackle complex SQL Server problems with confidence.

Full details and registration here.

  • Real World Cube Design and Performance Tuning with Analysis Services – Chris Webb – February 2012

A two day course that takes real world experience in showing you how to build a best practice Analysis Services cube, covering design issues such as data warehouse design and complex cube modelling. Day two then covers performance optimisation for Analysis Services, including MDX optimisation and cube processing.

Full details and registration here.

  • Introduction to Master Data Services with Jeremy Kashel – February 2012

An end to end look inside Master Data Services, this full day course will begin with a synopsis of Master Data Management before moving on to an overview of Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 Master Data Services (MDS). The remainder of the course will cover the major MDS topics, such as modelling and business rules, which will include a number of practical exercises.

More details and registration for here.

  • Introduction to MDX with Chris Webb – March 2012

The Introduction to MDX course aims to take you from the point of being a complete beginner with no previous knowledge of MDX up to the point where you can write 90% of the MDX calculations and queries you’ll ever need to write. The three day course covers the basics, such as sets, tuples, members to more advanced concepts such as scoped assignments and performance tuning.

Full details and registration here.

MDX with Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 Analysis Services Cookbook - Book Review

As you may have already seen, Packt have released a new MDX book, namely MDX with Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 Analysis Services Cookbook by Tomislav Piasevoli.

The book is written as cookbook, meaning that you can choose the individual ‘recipes’ that apply to whatever problem you’re trying to solve. Each recipe starts off with a section called ‘Getting Ready’, essentially giving you the base query to use, before moving onto ‘How to do it', which covers the main instructions for the recipe. There are then further sections, which explain how the example works and also suggest other functions/concepts that you may want to consider. This sort of cookbook style makes it really easy to follow, each recipe is displayed very clearly in the book.

A wide range of MDX problems are covered, from time calculations to context-aware calculations. Not every piece of the MDX functionality is covered, which is to be expected, given the size of the book. It also doesn’t cover the usual introduction to members/sets etc that MDX books tend to cover, but it’s clearly stated that having a working knowledge of MDX is a pre-requisite for the book.

I found the copy that I’ve been reading in the Adatis office, but I really do like it, so I’ll definitely be ordering my own copy!

Master Data Services Kindle Contest

This is a quick blog post to announce that Adatis are running a contest in conjunction with Packt around Master Data Services. The winner will receive an Amazon Kindle pre-loaded with our Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 Master Data Services book.

In order to enter, all you need to do is follow @AdatisBI and copy and paste our eBook on Kindle message and retweet it using your twitter account. The message is:

RT & Follow @AdatisBI for a chance to WIN the #Adatis MDS book pre-loaded on a Kindle ! (

Please mark your retweet with the hashtag (#), so that we can find and consider your entry. Only one entry per person will be accepted.

You can find out the full details of how to enter, as well as terms and conditions, on the following page.

Good luck!

Master Data Services Excel Add-in

Master Data Services in SQL Server Denali now includes an Excel add-in that allows MDS users to add and update data that exists within Master Data Services. For those of you that haven’t had a chance to download the latest CTP, this post gives an overview of what’s possible in the Excel Add-in.

Excel Add-in Overview

Once you install the Excel add-in (available here for download) you will see an additional toolbar in the ribbon, as shown below:


At a high level, the following functionality is available within the MDS add-in:

  • Retrieve members from a master data entity
  • Add or Update members (including annotations) and publish the changes back to MDS
  • Create entities in MDS if you have sufficient permission
  • Run the business rules

I don’t want this post to go on for ever, so today I’m going to focus on retrieving and updating members.

Retrieving MDS Entity Members

The Excel Add-in comes with a sidebar called the Explorer that can be used to connect to an MDS model and retrieve data from an entity within the model. What I quite like is that there is a filter button that allows a user to specify how to filter the data before loading it. In the example below, I’ve connected to the sample customer model, and have filtered the customer entity to only show customers of type 1 and customers from Seattle:


On the same filtering window its possible to choose the attributes to display. Therefore in the above example, by clicking the ‘Load Data’ button, a filtered list of customer members will be shown:


Editing Members

Once the members have been retrieved, editing is just a simple case of typing into the field that you want to change. In the example below I’ve chosen to change the names of two of the customers, which has caused the cells to be highlighted, informing me of the changes that I’ve made:


Domain-based attributes are also picked up nicely by Excel. Not that I imagine it would make too much sense, but it’s possible to change the Sales District North Western US (WUSSL) to Central US (CEUS), for example. Excel handles this by rendering a drop down for this domain attribute:


As it is in Master Data Manager, within Excel it’s also possible to display a domain attribute’s name.

Regardless of the type of attribute that gets changed, the changes will just remain in the Excel sheet until I click the publish button:


Clicking the the publish button will result in being prompted to make an optional annotation for each of the changes:


The annotations, as well as the member updates, will be committed to the Master Data Services database. The end result is that the transactions can be viewed as per 2008 R2 in Master Data Manager, or by right clicking in Excel and choosing ‘View Transactions’.


The Excel add-in doesn’t contain all the functionality available within Master Data Manager, but provides an interface that clearly Excel-based data stewards will be very comfortable with. It’s also much easier to do bulk updates in the Excel front-end, when compared to the web front-end.

That’s about if for now. There’s more to the Excel add-in, which I’m aiming to cover at SQLBits 9, plus Master Data Manager has been given a complete overhaul in Denali – hopefully I’ll find the time to cover that soon…

Master Data Services Training

As I’m sure you’ve seen, registration for SQLBits 9 – Query Across the Mersey is now open.

This time around I’ll be running a deep-dive training day with Tim Kent on Master Data Services. This will be a full day of training, showing you how MDS can be used to manage the master data in your organisation. We’re going to start by giving an overview of Master Data Management, before moving on to covering the following MDS topics in detail:

  • Installing, configuring, and maintaining Master Data Services
  • Creating and using models
  • Version management
  • Business rules and workflow
  • Importing data into Master Data Services
  • Integrating with other systems
  • Security

You can register for the MDS Training day, or one of the other 10 training days, by using the following registration page.

Remember, the early bird discount expires at midnight on Friday this week!

Update – We are running another MDS course in February 2012. Click here for the details.

Data Quality Services

As I’m sure you’ve heard, CTP3 of SQL Server Denali was released yesterday, and can be downloaded here. Denali includes Data Quality Services (DQS), Microsoft’s new data cleansing and matching component that’s based on the Zoomix acquisition that occurred a couple of years back. Data Quality Services didn’t make it into the first CTP, but is now available, so I though it would be worth a quick blog post.

Installing Data Quality Services

Data Quality Services is an option in the main install, but when you go to run the Data Quality Client, you’ll get a message stating that DQS is not installed. As far as I can tell, DQS needs to be installed manually, by running the DQSInstaller.exe, which you can find in the SQL Server Binn directory. This will create two SQL Server databases:


Data Quality Client

Once DQS is configured, you’ll be in a position to use the Data Quality Client, which is a windows application, available in 32 or 64 bit. Once you connect, you’ll get the following screen:


The knowledge base is the key to how DQS works, being utilised to determine the data quality of your source data. You can create your own knowledge base, using your own data, or even cloud-based data. For this example, I’m going to use the built in knowledge base called DQS Data.

As an example, I’ve created some data that I want to cleanse. It’s adventure works country data that I’ve put into a separate table that I’ve called dbo.Country.

My task now is is to clean this data, which I can do by creating a data quality project:


I’ve called my project Countries, and I’ve picked the built-in DQS Data knowledge base, which I noticed contains reference data for countries. The activity that I’ve selected is Cleansing, and then I’ve clicked Create.

DQS will then prompt for mapping the source data to one of the domains in the Knowledge Base. Here I’ve mapping my country name to the Country domain from the knowledge base:


After clicking the Start button on the next screen, the cleaning process starts, which gives the following results:


I put a couple of typos into my source data, such as changing Algeria to ‘Algerian’ and Albania to ‘Albana’. These were picked up by DQS, along with a few others, but a user has the opportunity to approve or reject, via the radio buttons shown above. I chose to approve the first two, and then clicked next. In the final screen, DQS allows you to output the cleaned data to a separate table, as shown below:


If you go into the table that DQS has created, you will see that there is a Name_Status column, which holds the cleaning status on a per record basis:


This can be used to update the source data, if required, and therefore address the data quality issues.


This has been a quick introduction to cleaning data with Data Quality Services. There’s plenty more to look at, and I hope to find time to do so at some point - In particular I’m keen to take a look at how DQS works with Master Data Services. I’ve noticed that there’s also a new MS DQS blog ( – I’m sure that will be a great resource for DQS learning.

Adding a Calculated Field to an Excel Pivot Table With Analysis Services

One question that I get asked from time to time is how to add a calculated field to an Excel Pivot Table that’s connected to an Analysis Services cube. I’ve been aware of a workaround to do this for a while, but a quick Bing :-) revealed that the common answer given to this question is that it’s not possible.

It definitely is possible, it’s just not that obvious and is perhaps a little limited. Here’s how it can be done in Excel 2010:

Sample Cube

First of all, connect to a cube and produce a pivot table report. I’ve connected to the 2008 R2 version of the Adventure Works DW cube and have produced the following report, using the Internet Sales Amount measure:


Adding a Calculated Field

If you now open the Field List, you will see that Internet Sales Amount is selected of course. Here’s the trick – you can select the measure twice by dragging it into the Values area, which will give the following:


Now click the drop down next to Internet Sales Amount2, which will display the following window:


You can change the name of the field – I’ve called mine Percent Share. In the Show Values as drop-down, I’ve picked % of Grand Total, so that I can see the share of the sales in each country across all years. So now the report is as follows:



A better approach is to put as many calculations in the cube as possible, but as some calculations requested by users are report-specific, this feature of Pivot Tables allows users to produce the reports that they want.

The calculations that you can carry out are only those in the ‘Show values as’ drop-down. There’s quite a few in there, especially in Excel 2010, as mentioned here. If that’s not enough, then an alternative is to use the OLAP Pivot Table Extensions, which is available to download on Codeplex.

Master Data Services in SQL Server Denali

If you didn’t make it to Tech Ed in North America last week, then you can download session recordings and take part in the labs at the Tech Ed site here. The session recordings are also available for streaming or download on Channel 9.

Today I wanted to highlight in particular John McAllister’s session titled Managing Master Data with MDS and Microsoft Excel. We’ve heard for a while about the use of Excel with the new version of MDS, so it’s great to finally see it. The key points from the session for me are:

  • The new Excel add-in:
    • Allows the editing of Master Data (even lets you use Excel formulas) and allows you to publish back to MDS. It seems to provide the same functionality as the UI that we’re used to – it’s aware of the domain attributes, giving you drop downs in the relevant cells, and is aware of the business rules for an entity.
    • Also lets you actually build an MDS model from Excel.
  • Improvements to the current web-based UI (Master Data Manager). The design has changed in several places, for example it seems that the grid now has a side bar to display the member that you’ve clicked on. This “side bar” looks to have better validation capability than the current R2 member editing experience.
  • Integration with Data Quality Services. It’s a little unclear exactly what this will be, as it’s not shown in the video, so I think we’ll have to wait a while to find out.
  • The database now contains a staging table per entity, as opposed to a single shared staging table.
  • Improved Performance – this is in several areas of the product apparently, but it’s certainly visible in the video that the Master Data Manager UI is quicker.

I’ll be doing a series of blog posts on the new features once the new CTP/beta of Denali is released.

New Master Data Services Book

For the past seven months, Adatis have been working on new book for Master Data Services. The book, titled SQL Server 2008 R2 Master Data Services, will be published by Packt Publishing and will be released on 30th June.

For those of you who don’t know (I certainly didn’t), Packt operate something called the RAW program. This allows you to download an electronic copy of the book in draft format, as the chapters are made available. If you want, you can also feedback any changes that you’d like to see in the book, which means you get a chance to shape the book with the content that you want to include. What’s great is that when the book is finished, you get to download a copy of the e-book for free.

We’re almost done, just another month or so of late nights and early mornings before the June release date! Until then, the book is available on Packt’s site here, and is also available for pre-order on Amazon here.

Microsoft Data Warehouse Toolkit Second Edition - Book Review
There is now a second edition of the Kimball Microsoft Data Warehouse Toolkit, which contains updated material for SQL Server 2008 R2. The book is out now in the US, and will be released in the UK in towards the end of March. I’ve got hold of a copy, so I thought it would be worth giving it a review.

As with the previous edition, the new version of the book starts off by covering the Business Requirements, before explaining the core concepts associated with the Kimball approach, such as surrogate keys and slowly changing dimensions, for example.

An overview of the Microsoft BI stack is given, before explaining how to build each part of the data warehouse in turn, covering the database engine, SSIS, SSAS, SSRS and SharePoint. There are also new sections on both Master Data Services and PowerPivot – personally I found the PowerPivot chapter to be really interesting – there’s a good explanation of how PowerPivot can compliment the data warehouse, as well as explaining how to use it of course.

The latter part of the book explains management of the data warehouse, covering security, backups, metadata, maintenance. The final chapter, “Present Imperatives and Future Outlook” includes a narrative on common problems in DW projects, as well as an honest appraisal of the MS BI stack which you can’t help but agree with.


So the burning question is should you buy this book? That needs to be answered from two perspectives – 1)If you’re an owner of the original and 2)If you don’t own the original. If you do own the original, then you’ll find that there’s a huge amount of content that’s the same across the two editions. There is new content – particularly around MDS, PowerPivot, Change Data Capture and Compression, for example, as well as updates to some of the old content. £30 is quite a lot to pay for a book that’s similar to a book that you already own, but overall I think its worth going for.

If you don’t own the original then you will find this book to be an extremely useful asset in implementing MS data warehousing solutions, and I wouldn’t hesitate to buy it. One point I will make is that this doesn’t represent an exhaustive how to for each of the components (E.g. SSAS), which I personally think is fine. I know a handful of people made this gripe at the first edition, but realistically there’s only so much you can cram into 648 pages on the huge subject of data warehousing AND then cover each element of the MS BI stack.

Upcoming Microsoft Events

I’m pleased to say that I’m delivering a couple of Master Data Services sessions at Microsoft events over the next few months.

SQL Bits

Firstly, as I’m sure you’ve heard, SQL Bits 8 is running in Brighton from 7th – 9th April. I’m delivering a session on the Saturday that will show how Master Data Services business rules work, which will include looking at how to create and use a SharePoint workflow.

Although last I heard it was getting pretty full, you can hopefully still register for SQL Bits here.

Tech Days 2011

Tech Days is running again this year, from the 23rd – 25th May. There are a number of sessions running for Tech Days in London over the 3 days, covering areas such as Windows Azure, Windows Phone and of course SQL Server. The session that I’m doing is to show how we’ve implemented Master Data Services at one of clients, EMI, and how they benefit from using MDS.

You can register for Tech Days 2011 here.

Posted: Mar 03 2011, 09:08 AM by Jeremy Kashel | with no comments
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