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Ust Oldfield's Blog

LETS Process Data–Modern ETL for the Data Lake

At the PASS Summit this year, I attended a session by Michael Rys. In this session he introduced the concept of LETS as an approach to process data in the data lake. If you are familiar with data lake, then you will be familiar of having to apply a schema to the data held within. The LETS approach is purpose design for schematization.

Where ETL stands for Extract, Transform, Load or ELT stands for Extract, Load, Transform – LETS stands for Load, Extract, Transform, Store.

Data are Loaded into the data lake

Data are Extracted and schematized

Data are Transformed in rowsets

Data are Stored in a location, such as the Catalog in Azure Data Lake Analytics, Azure Data Warehouse, Azure Analysis Services, for analysis purposes.

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I really like this approach as it makes sense for how data are handled in the data lake. It’s something that I will be advocating and using, and I hope you do too!



SQL PASS Summit–Day 3 and Reflections

Apologies for the delay in getting this blog out to you all. When PASS finished on the Friday we had to rush over to the airport to get our flight back to the UK. When I landed on Saturday I was suffering from jet lag and only now am I in a fit state to blog again.

 

I got the impression from the schedule that Day 3 of PASS was going to be a wind-down day as very few of the sessions seemed as intense as the previous days’ sessions.

My first session of the day, despite being the last day of PASS, was early. Earlier than any of the keynotes, but worth getting up for – a Chalk Talk with the Data Warehouse Fast Track Team. This also included the Azure Data Warehouse team as well, and the conversation was much more focused on the Azure side of Data Warehousing. Lots of conversations around Polybase and patterns in how to get data from on-prem to cloud using Polybase. In terms of patterns, it was reassuring to learn that the approach Adatis has adopted is spot on. Simon Whiteley is the man to see about that. His blog is here: http://blogs.adatis.co.uk/simonwhiteley/

On the Fast Track theme, my next session was  exploring the SQL Server Fast Track Data Warehouse, which was interesting to know about, especially the various testing that these pre-configured servers go through. At some point next year, Microsoft will be releasing the Fast Track Testing Programme to the community so that everyone will be able to test their hardware to the same exacting standards and know what their maximum throughput / IO demand etc., is in order to properly gauge hardware performance.

After this session I got talking to a few people about data warehousing. The conversation was so engrossing that I missed the session that I was due to attend. Luckily, most of the sessions at PASS are recorded so I will have to chase up that session and others when they get released.

 

My final session of the day was a Deep Dive of SQL SSIS 2016. It wasn’t so much a deep dive and more a run-down of upcoming features. The one I’m most excited about is the Azure Data Lake Store connector, which will be released once Azure Data Lake goes into General Availability, which I’ve been told is soon…..

 

Now that I’ve had to week to digest and reflect on SQL PASS Summit, my findings are thus:

SQL PASS Summit is invaluable.

It provides an opportunity to learn so much from so many people, and not just learn from the presenters. There are so many people from all over the SQL community, with different experiences of SQL, different experiences of data, different experiences of life, that you can’t not learn something. PASS provides the easy environment to share ideas among peers and learn new technologies, new ways of working and new tricks.

I’ve already started sharing some of my learning's with colleagues and I can’t wait to share them with everyone else too!

SQL PASS Summit–Day 2

Day 2, Thursday, started off with a keynote from David DeWitt on cloud data warehousing, scalable storage and scalable compute. This set my theme for the majority of the day – which turned out to be big data tech.

 

My first session was with James Rowland-Jones and Kevin Ngo on sizing Azure SQL Data Warehouse for proposals – essentially answering “how much is this going to cost me?”. There are various factors to consider, which I will blog on separately. I’ve already briefly fed back to members of the team and they’re excited to know what I learnt in more detail.

 

My second session was about best practices for Big BI which, unfortunately, ended up being a sales pitch and I came away having felt that I’ve didn’t learn anything. There’s a lot of promise for BI in the big data space, so watch this space as we explore Azure SQL Data Warehouse, Azure Data Lake (Store and Analytics), and other big data technology for BI.

 

The third session was with Michael Rys on Tuning and Optimising U-SQL Queries for Maximum Performance. It was a full on session, learnt loads and took loads of notes. I need time to digest this information as Michael covered off a very complex topic, very quickly. I will, however, be blogging on it in due course.

 

After an intense third session, I chose a less intense session for the last session of the day: a Q&A with the SQL Engineering team. This was a great opportunity to learn from other users how they’re using SQL. Most users who asked questions were wanting to know about indexing, backups and High Availability.

 

Tonight – packing, and networking before the last day of PASS tomorrow!

SQL PASS Summit–Day 1

Day 1, Wednesday, technically started on Tuesday with a newbies speed networking event in which we had to rotate through a crowd of 10 other people - introducing ourselves and asking questions about our professional lives. This was awkward to begin with but, as the evening wore on, introducing ourselves to strangers became a lot easier and more normal. We then moved on to the Welcome Reception and then a #SQLKaraoke event. Great opportunities to meet new people from different areas of the world and parts of the community.

Wednesday morning proper, began with a keynote from Joseph Sirosh. This keynote from Joseph essentially set the tone and theme for a large part of the conference sessions - Azure, Big Data and the Cortana Intelligence Suite.

The first session I attended was on Design Patterns for Azure SQL Database (for which a separate blog will be forthcoming).

The next session I attended was about incorporating Azure Data Lake Analytics into a BI environment (again, another blog is in the pipeline).

My final session of the day was Going Under the Hood with Azure Data Lake. This was the most insightful session of the day, which has subsequently sparked my brain into Data Lake mode (expect many blogs on this), and went through how Azure Data Lake works as well as how the U-SQL language works and resources are allocated.

Tonight - more networking.

So far, the community has been so welcoming and I’m very much looking forward to tomorrow where I’ll be learning about Big Data solutions and best practices. I’m also looking forward to sharing all my experiences and learning's with my colleagues and wider SQL Community.